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Unique Journey to Stage: “The Odyssey”

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Homer’s “The Odyssey” is making a grand comeback from freshman year English to appear on the big stage – Powell, to be exact. But this year, things are happening a little differently. Going above and beyond to ensure quality, director Steven Broyles contacted the agent of the playwright, Mary Zimmerman, who adapted the epic to the stage herself.

“We’re cutting it down to size so we can take it to One-Act,” Broyles said. “We have to ask permission from the artist.” One-Act is the theater competition hosted by the Georgia High School Association, an event Wesleyan intends to win. The Wolf Players are always looking to impress the audience, and a shortened play length is one aspect that keeps them engaged.

When asked about how he planned to impress the audience, Broyles said, “It’s going to be something very unique. Technology now makes things look very real… this is sort of stepping back from that.” He explained the more traditional, personal methods Wesleyan is using to prepare. The bamboo poles for props, blue lights casted over chairs for a boat in the sea and skill of the actors are all meant to bring back the essence of theater.

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Wesleyan Players Evoke Emotion in “The Crucible”

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    Darby Carroll and Zach Green perform in The Crucible
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    Emily Sabonis-Chafee portrays Elizabeth Proctor.
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    Abrianna Harris, Alexis Wildermuth and Jaucqir Lafond put on emotional performances.

With their final production of the 2016-2017 season, the Wesleyan Wolf Players ended on a solemn note with the emotional, convicting and memorable performance of Arthur Miller’s “The Crucible.”

Taking place in Salem, Massachusetts in 1692, The Crucible follows the twisted agendas, drastic behavior and the widespread paranoia of the Salem Witch Trials. More specifically the story follows the mischievous and deceitful Abigail Williams, played by Darby Carroll, as her web of lies entangles her former lover John Proctor and his wife Elizabeth, played by Seniors Zach Green and Emily Sabonis-Chaffee. Keep Reading

Community Gathers for Wesleyan Artist Market

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    Middle and Lower school art were displayed all around the market. Zetzsche.
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    An art display set up by volunteers for the 2017 Artist Market. Zetzsche.
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    Full view of the Wesleyan Artist Market 2017. Zetzsche.
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    Sophomore Zoe Jackson poses with a variety of her homemade soaps and bath products. Zetzsche.
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    Artists set up on the bottom floor of Yancy for the Artist Market. Zetzsche.

Along with the arrival of spring, came the bloom of the 2017 Wesleyan Artist Market. For the past year, parents and volunteers alike worked diligently to perfect this year’s market. The Wesleyan Artist Market is a yearly opportunity for artists throughout the community to come together to showcase and sell their work.

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New Member Inducted into the Fine Arts Circle of Honor

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Wesleyan created the Fine Arts Circle of Honor in 2007 to show appreciation to alumni and members of the Wesleyan community who have made significant contributions to the Fine Arts program at Wesleyan. Meg Foster, Director of Fine Arts, said it is “a place to honor our best and brightest artists, in visual arts and the performing arts.” Because this is such a high honor to be nominated, the committee is very selective.

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Wesleyan Brings “Kiss Me, Kate” Alive

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Wesleyan’s winter musicals involve countless hours of pre-planning, practicing, costuming and set design. Director Steve Broyles said, “We set very high expectations for everyone, from ensemble to leads; from choreography to set & lighting design; from costumes to props. That’s the only way we can come to the end, look back, and be completely satisfied that we left it all on the stage.” With over 40 people involved, both on and off stage, the show was counted by actors as a success with help from the lead actors of senior Anna Ree and junior Leandro Haddad.

Ree and Haddad occupied the lead roles of Lilli Vanessi and Frederic Graham respectively, and excelled in bringing these characters to life. Wunderbar, an affectionate duet between Haddad and Ree, established one of the many tender moments in the show, but songs like I Hate Men, sung by Ree, and Where is the Life that Late I Led?, sung by Haddad, showed off the show’s comedic flare. Keep Reading

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