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Let’s Hear it For the Women

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The common misconception about Women’s History Month is that the culture is diminishing what it means to be a woman by confining it to one month. However, it is meant to highlight women, to bring to light how important women are.

A group of senior girls in the free period room got together to talk about how important Women’s History Month is to them. When asked the girls what the hardest part about being a woman was, senior Emma Watkins said, “Female maintenance standards. For example, shaving. Women get shamed for not shaving or being completely smooth.” I asked how she felt about the expectation to shave, and if we should all be expected to shave or none of us should have to. Emma replied, “I think you do what you want to do.”

The expectation to shave was brought about by consumerism. When men left to fight in World War II, razor companies had lost their target marketing group. So, they decided to change their audience and convince women to shave. Ever since then, it has become an expectation and a guideline for women to follow.

But International Women’s Month is not something only to be celebrated by women; its a month of recognition for women, but senior Billy Stepp reflects on the importance of women in his life. Stepp was adjusting his broken backpack when he said, “I love my mom and I’m so thankful for her because she always sews my clothes and backpack.” Stepp continued, “My mom shaped me into the person I am today.”

Senior Garrett Huggins said, “I’m so thankful for so many teachers at this school, especially Mrs. Morris. She’s my role model.” Sophomore Ellie Archer said, “I’m so thankful for Mrs. Brooker, she always encourages me and really inspires me.” Students reflect on their favorite female teachers and staff at Wesleyan as there are so many wonderful women who are employed.

This shows students how lucky they are to not only attend Wesleyan, but to have so many wonderful teachers that they look up to as well. Because out of the world’s 123 million illiterate youth, 76 million are female. Even with extended effort and outreach programs that provide women with access to education in third world countries, the female literacy rate is still under fifty percent.

This is why Women’s History Month is so important. It not only brings to light and highlights important women in history, but also shows what the population still has to work on. There has been a lot of change in the past. From women’s suffrage to gaining access to education for women in less developed countries, freedoms for women have come a long way. Yet there is still so much more to accomplish, and together, the world can accomplish this.

The Black Panther Sleuths into World Topics

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    T’Challa, played by Chadwick Boseman, and his ex-lover, Nakia, played by Lupita Nyong’D. CNN
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    The Black Panther suits up and prepares to fight. Deadline.

The “Black Panther,” which debuted Feb. 16, is the latest Marvel superhero solo movie. Ever since the last Avengers (Civil War) movie where the superhero Black Panther made his first appearance, his solo cameo has been highly anticipated. Although the movie did satisfy many people who went in with high expectations, for others it did not quite meet those same expectations. Keep Reading

American Students “March for Our Lives”

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School shootings are just as American as apple pie. As of 2012, America’s rate of gun homicide has more than tripled the rate of gun homicides in other developed countries, averaging 29.7 homicides per 1 million people. It is universally known that gun violence is a big problem, but the question is, how do we handle it? Keep Reading

Sozo Children’s Choir Brings Joy to Wesleyan

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“A child from Uganda, a teenager from the U.S. and an adult from Johns Creek are all part of one humanity under Christ,” said Christian Life Director Greg Lisson. As part of February’s Christian Life theme, “One Humanity,” Wesleyan partnered with the Sozo Ugandan Children’s Choir to bring a unique celebration of diversity to the community.

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The Man Whose Dream Changed the World

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    Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. giving his “I Have A Dream" speech in Washington D.C. Evergrowth Coaching.
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    Image of Oprah Winfrey, the first black woman to receive the Cecil B. DeMille lifetime achievement award, which is the highest honor of the Golden Globes. Jim Ruymen/UPI.
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    Collage of images from the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site. Monica Tarnawski.
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    English teacher Monica Tarnawski visits the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site. Monica Tarnawski.

Although millions of people in the United States were born on Jan. 15th, only one man has the honor of having the day be dedicated to his life and accomplishments. This man made equality his mantra, made freedom burn in the hearts and minds of all those who suffered from racial oppression and made change his life’s work. This man has earned commendation and respect not only from African Americans, but from people of all colors and races. Lionized in history as a pioneer of the Civil Rights Movement, he was an advocate for non-violent protest and had a dream to see a world where skin color is not the foremost authority. This man is none other than the great Martin Luther King Jr. Keep Reading

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