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Dr. Pinkett Smith

Reflection

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The mirror is a powerful possession, simply because it has the influence of an inescapable truth: a reflection. When someone gazes into a mirror, there are no edits or touch ups or Photoshop. There is nothing but reality in the form of a reflection, a truth everyone has to come to terms with. Whatever truth is produced through this reflection has massive effects on the human spirit and mind. These effects are magnified even more by what a person carries with them to the mirror. Everyone brings something to the mirror.  The triumph, tragedies, perceptions, perspectives and most importantly, the words that have been seared into them by others.  These emotional and mental weights distort the already mighty reflection, causing a person to become a slave to the mirror and feel despairing to any chances of changing what they see.  For some, this experience is all too real.

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Because of Them…I Can: Black History Month

in Features by
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    Black History Month chapel participants pose for a picture after chapel. Sophie Zetzsche.
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    Singers perform a Negro Spiritual song at Black History Month chapel. Dr. Pinkett Smith.
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    Junior Lauren Hill speaks at Black History Month chapel. Dr. Pinkett Smith. Sophie Zetzsche.

People often think of February as the month of love, complete with boxes of heart-shaped chocolate and teddy bears, but behind the lovey-dovey-ness that is Valentine’s Day, February also brings with it the month-long celebration that is Black History Month.

Black History Month is the “annual celebration by African Americans and a time for recognizing the central role of blacks in U.S. history” (History.com). The event started as “Negro History Week” in 1926. The idea originated from Carter G. Woodson, an African American historian, author, journalist and the founder of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (History.com). Woodson is famous for a lot of the books he wrote, but his most famous book is the Mis-Education of the Negro teaching African American self-empowerment (Biography.com).

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