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kendra morris

Senioritis Plagues Class of 2019

in Features by
  • harrison.jpg
    Senior Harrison Larner sleeps through free period rather than working on homework. Sophie Zetzsche.
  • puzzles.jpg
    Senior Grace Kennedy does a puzzle in class instead of listening. Sophie Zetzsche.
  • kyle-e1548959172616.jpg
    Senior Kyle Cleveland games instead of working on homework during free period. Sophie Zetzsche.

Although the stomach bug is going around Wesleyan, Senioritis is catching up, taking masses of seniors up in its storm. Senioritis is a disease plaguing second semester seniors across the country. Although some have been infected since August, the disease is just now spreading throughout the entire Wesleyan senior class. The question is: will they make it?

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Teachers Share Advice to the 2018 Graduates

in Editorial/Features by

Dear Seniors,

“It’s not easy, but, then again, it’s not supposed to be easy.

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The Great American-Journalism Baking Contest

in Features by

At the culmination of a long and successful year in journalism, the journalists wanted to celebrate the end of the year. And the best way they knew how came in the form of a bake-off. As the bake-off used to be an annual event, this year’s journalism class hoped to continue the tradition.

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What I Wish I Had Known about Standardized Testing

in Features by

You are startled awake at 7:15 a.m. on a Saturday, thinking you just accidentally set a school alarm despite the weekend. Then, you bolt awake, suddenly remembering today is the dreaded ACT day. Scrambling to scrounge up some #2 pencils from the depths of your backpack, you remember the math section and panic, taking the batteries from your family’s TV remote for your calculator. You throw on some sweatpants with your pajama shirt, pray your printer will hurry up and spit out your ACT admission ticket and hop in the car to make it to your testing center by 8 a.m. You plop down at exactly 7:59 a.m. into your assigned seat at an unfamiliar school.

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Let’s Hear it For the Women

in News by

The common misconception about Women’s History Month is that the culture is diminishing what it means to be a woman by confining it to one month. However, it is meant to highlight women, to bring to light how important women are.

A group of senior girls in the free period room got together to talk about how important Women’s History Month is to them. When asked the girls what the hardest part about being a woman was, senior Emma Watkins said, “Female maintenance standards. For example, shaving. Women get shamed for not shaving or being completely smooth.” I asked how she felt about the expectation to shave, and if we should all be expected to shave or none of us should have to. Emma replied, “I think you do what you want to do.”

The expectation to shave was brought about by consumerism. When men left to fight in World War II, razor companies had lost their target marketing group. So, they decided to change their audience and convince women to shave. Ever since then, it has become an expectation and a guideline for women to follow.

But International Women’s Month is not something only to be celebrated by women; its a month of recognition for women, but senior Billy Stepp reflects on the importance of women in his life. Stepp was adjusting his broken backpack when he said, “I love my mom and I’m so thankful for her because she always sews my clothes and backpack.” Stepp continued, “My mom shaped me into the person I am today.”

Senior Garrett Huggins said, “I’m so thankful for so many teachers at this school, especially Mrs. Morris. She’s my role model.” Sophomore Ellie Archer said, “I’m so thankful for Mrs. Brooker, she always encourages me and really inspires me.” Students reflect on their favorite female teachers and staff at Wesleyan as there are so many wonderful women who are employed.

This shows students how lucky they are to not only attend Wesleyan, but to have so many wonderful teachers that they look up to as well. Because out of the world’s 123 million illiterate youth, 76 million are female. Even with extended effort and outreach programs that provide women with access to education in third world countries, the female literacy rate is still under fifty percent.

This is why Women’s History Month is so important. It not only brings to light and highlights important women in history, but also shows what the population still has to work on. There has been a lot of change in the past. From women’s suffrage to gaining access to education for women in less developed countries, freedoms for women have come a long way. Yet there is still so much more to accomplish, and together, the world can accomplish this.

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